1. keithboykin:

When Utah residents saw 22-year-old Darrien Hunt carrying a toy sword, they called police who shot and killed him. But when 22-year-old Joseph Kelley carried an assault rifle to a JC Penney store in Utah, he walked out without a scratch on his body. They were both the same age. Both in the same state. But only one was considered “suspicious.” And you still believe America is color blind?

    keithboykin:

    When Utah residents saw 22-year-old Darrien Hunt carrying a toy sword, they called police who shot and killed him. But when 22-year-old Joseph Kelley carried an assault rifle to a JC Penney store in Utah, he walked out without a scratch on his body. They were both the same age. Both in the same state. But only one was considered “suspicious.” And you still believe America is color blind?

  2. stairmageddon:

solarsenpai:

siopold:

miracleyangwenli:

siopold:

the funny thing about dril posts is that they actually do have a structure to them– they hit a kind of conceptual caesura halfway through, a point where there’s no inevitable logical connection between what’s been said and what’s still to come. here, the first sentence didn’t need to result in the second, yet it’s not “lol random” either; the speaker is angry about his boss’ draconian ferret-kissing policy, and reacts in kind, and even the reference to a “screen saver” reminds us that we’re in an office. it’s a narrative progression that, despite having an internal logic, alienates its punchline from its setup. who the hell is this person?

one thing i love about @dril posts is how they all seem to take place in a universe that is somewhat like our own, but with the habitus of white middle america taken to a bizarre, absurd, but strangely logical conclusion. take this one, for instance: 

so we have our setting: a security guard protecting the american flag in the betsy ross museum, something almost archetypically american and middle class. but once again the first part, or setup, for the punchline, “fucking the flag,” careens the joke into an alien punchline that still, given the setting, makes sense. @dril’s security guard character imitates a sort-of cop-talk, the banter of a security guard, “buddy, they wont even let me fuck it”. you can imagine a similar response from a guard at any museum, but we’re talking about Fucking the American Flag, here. i really love @dril. 

it’s astonishing that a human being thinks of those posts. some person, someone out there whose existence we have to infer, because all we know is that those posts occur and they must be coming from somewhere. “the @dril​ tweeter” resonates as “the beowulf poet” does, except beowulf (which i’ve only read in translation, so i’m not an authority) has never made any use of the english language as baffling and sublime and somehow primally interlaced with the stuff of human consciousness as “IF THE ZOO BANS ME FOR HOLLERING AT THE ANIMALS I WILL FACE GOD AND WALK BACKWARDS INTO HELL.”

This is my favorite post, I am so glad I found it again.


gopnika

    stairmageddon:

    solarsenpai:

    siopold:

    miracleyangwenli:

    siopold:

    the funny thing about dril posts is that they actually do have a structure to them– they hit a kind of conceptual caesura halfway through, a point where there’s no inevitable logical connection between what’s been said and what’s still to come. here, the first sentence didn’t need to result in the second, yet it’s not “lol random” either; the speaker is angry about his boss’ draconian ferret-kissing policy, and reacts in kind, and even the reference to a “screen saver” reminds us that we’re in an office. it’s a narrative progression that, despite having an internal logic, alienates its punchline from its setup. who the hell is this person?

    one thing i love about @dril posts is how they all seem to take place in a universe that is somewhat like our own, but with the habitus of white middle america taken to a bizarre, absurd, but strangely logical conclusion. take this one, for instance: 

    so we have our setting: a security guard protecting the american flag in the betsy ross museum, something almost archetypically american and middle class. but once again the first part, or setup, for the punchline, “fucking the flag,” careens the joke into an alien punchline that still, given the setting, makes sense. @dril’s security guard character imitates a sort-of cop-talk, the banter of a security guard, “buddy, they wont even let me fuck it”. you can imagine a similar response from a guard at any museum, but we’re talking about Fucking the American Flag, here. 

    i really love @dril. 

    it’s astonishing that a human being thinks of those posts. some person, someone out there whose existence we have to infer, because all we know is that those posts occur and they must be coming from somewhere. “the @dril​ tweeter” resonates as “the beowulf poet” does, except beowulf (which i’ve only read in translation, so i’m not an authority) has never made any use of the english language as baffling and sublime and somehow primally interlaced with the stuff of human consciousness as “IF THE ZOO BANS ME FOR HOLLERING AT THE ANIMALS I WILL FACE GOD AND WALK BACKWARDS INTO HELL.”

    This is my favorite post, I am so glad I found it again.

    gopnika

  3. red-lipstick:

    Nicolas Demeersman aka Pretty Punk (b. 1978, Seclin) Worldwide ongoing Fucking Tourist series 2009-2014 Captures The Resentment Of Locals With A Simple Gesture. (Info with each pic)

  4. White tumblr can understand that wearing a short skirt and high heels doesn't mean you were asking for it, but they can't understand that sagging your pants and saying nigga doesn't mean you deserved to be killed.

  5. whatisthat-velvet:

    thechanelmuse:

    You cannot tell me that some of these don’t sound like actual articles.

    In case you missed it.

    Lmfao @ the Adele one. GOD.

  6. bapeonion:

bapeonion:

logic-and-art:

christel-thoughts:

quickhits:

Unrest in Ferguson about a lot more than police shooting unarmed teen.

the big point
look at the search rates then look at the contraband hit rates.
the police are terrorizing Black people for no good reason… even though they’re getting more evidence of crime off whites.

crunched a couple of numbers and even taking into account that the black population is about double the white population in the “local” area (i’d like some definition on that but i’ll assume in the meantime that it’s the boundaries of jurisdiction), black people as a group are being stopped 6.75 times more than white people as a group, and even when put in perspective with the population ratios, are being stopped 3.61 times more than white people (and make up 90% of the people searched).
The disparity numbers listed indicate that the black population is overrepresented in stop rates by 137%, and this number reads as way too low to me (compare to the number I calculated of 361%).
christel-thoughts pointed out the contraband rate specifically, which is notable because searches of white people produced contraband 12.33% more times than searches of black people, but the arrest rate for black individuals is virtually twice that of white people.

let no one say “rioting and looting” is destroying this community. make no mistake, this community is being destroyed systematically, but not by its citizens

Ran some simple numbers on this full dataset and even simple percentages show how disgustingly prejudiced Ferguson PD officers are. I translated the raw data to a spreadsheet for anyone that wants to go farther with the data. 
Visit https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1of_kjLQAlEMc7kMQmtxv-KiNwpPzCQpmH-rDk8uMCaY/edit?usp=sharing for everyting I’ve got, and to snag the raw data for your own use. 
Highlights from 2013: 
63% of Ferguson, MO’s total population is black.
86% of all citizens stopped by police in Ferguson are black.
91% of all citizens searched by police in Ferguson are black.
92% of all arrested citizens in Ferguson are black.
Black citizens are searched almost twice as often as White citizens, but White citizens are 1.6 times more likely to have contraband found on their person during a search.
Black citizens in Ferguson make up approx. 90% of all traffic stops in the city. 
At a traffic stop, Black people are charged most often for license violations. White people, Hispanics, Asians, American Indians, and “Other” citizens are most often charged for Moving violations, aka speeding. (Fun correlation - state legislature in MO is trying to pass more strict Voter ID laws. Wonder who they’re keeping out?)
Black citizens are the least likely of all racial segments to be let off with a warning. White citizens, by comparison, are almost twice as likely to be let off with a Warning.
Black citizens are disproportionately targeted for traffic stops on local roads. A black person in Ferguson is more likely to get pulled over on a back road than a white person is….well, anywhere. 
Black Female drivers are more often targeted by Ferguson PD for traffic stops than Male drivers. Across all other racial segments, Males are more likely to be pulled over.
Nearly half of all searches performed by Ferguson PD on Black citizens occur after an arrest, not before. 
More than half of all arrests of Black citizens are for outstanding warrants. 
Ferguson’s White citizens are technically more dangerous than Black citizens: White citizens are arrested more frequently for drug charges, DUI/BAC violations, property offense (collisions/ramming/etc.) and traffic violations.
Any police officer worth their salt should know they can’t hide from the facts. Here are the facts behind Ferguson PD’s activity last year. Understand that these numbers clearly illustrate the story of a police department systematically prioritizing the punishment of its Black population over any other group within its jurisdiction.

    bapeonion:

    bapeonion:

    logic-and-art:

    christel-thoughts:

    quickhits:

    Unrest in Ferguson about a lot more than police shooting unarmed teen.

    the big point

    look at the search rates then look at the contraband hit rates.

    the police are terrorizing Black people for no good reason… even though they’re getting more evidence of crime off whites.

    crunched a couple of numbers and even taking into account that the black population is about double the white population in the “local” area (i’d like some definition on that but i’ll assume in the meantime that it’s the boundaries of jurisdiction), black people as a group are being stopped 6.75 times more than white people as a group, and even when put in perspective with the population ratios, are being stopped 3.61 times more than white people (and make up 90% of the people searched).

    The disparity numbers listed indicate that the black population is overrepresented in stop rates by 137%, and this number reads as way too low to me (compare to the number I calculated of 361%).

    christel-thoughts pointed out the contraband rate specifically, which is notable because searches of white people produced contraband 12.33% more times than searches of black people, but the arrest rate for black individuals is virtually twice that of white people.

    let no one say “rioting and looting” is destroying this community. make no mistake, this community is being destroyed systematically, but not by its citizens

    Ran some simple numbers on this full dataset and even simple percentages show how disgustingly prejudiced Ferguson PD officers are. I translated the raw data to a spreadsheet for anyone that wants to go farther with the data. 

    Visit https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1of_kjLQAlEMc7kMQmtxv-KiNwpPzCQpmH-rDk8uMCaY/edit?usp=sharing for everyting I’ve got, and to snag the raw data for your own use. 

    Highlights from 2013: 

    • 63% of Ferguson, MO’s total population is black.
    • 86% of all citizens stopped by police in Ferguson are black.
    • 91% of all citizens searched by police in Ferguson are black.
    • 92% of all arrested citizens in Ferguson are black.
    • Black citizens are searched almost twice as often as White citizens, but White citizens are 1.6 times more likely to have contraband found on their person during a search.
    • Black citizens in Ferguson make up approx. 90% of all traffic stops in the city. 
    • At a traffic stop, Black people are charged most often for license violations. White people, Hispanics, Asians, American Indians, and “Other” citizens are most often charged for Moving violations, aka speeding. (Fun correlation - state legislature in MO is trying to pass more strict Voter ID laws. Wonder who they’re keeping out?)
    • Black citizens are the least likely of all racial segments to be let off with a warning. White citizens, by comparison, are almost twice as likely to be let off with a Warning.
    • Black citizens are disproportionately targeted for traffic stops on local roads. A black person in Ferguson is more likely to get pulled over on a back road than a white person is….well, anywhere. 
    • Black Female drivers are more often targeted by Ferguson PD for traffic stops than Male drivers. Across all other racial segments, Males are more likely to be pulled over.
    • Nearly half of all searches performed by Ferguson PD on Black citizens occur after an arrest, not before. 
    • More than half of all arrests of Black citizens are for outstanding warrants. 
    • Ferguson’s White citizens are technically more dangerous than Black citizens: White citizens are arrested more frequently for drug charges, DUI/BAC violations, property offense (collisions/ramming/etc.) and traffic violations.

    Any police officer worth their salt should know they can’t hide from the facts. Here are the facts behind Ferguson PD’s activity last year. Understand that these numbers clearly illustrate the story of a police department systematically prioritizing the punishment of its Black population over any other group within its jurisdiction.

  7. deejul:

beybladebrigade:

pag-asaharibon:

not-your-asian-fantasy:

Early Feminism in the PhilippinesThe Philippines has been noted as having one of the smallest gender disparities in the world. The gender gap has been closed in both health and education; the country has had two female presidents (Corazon Aquino from 1986-1992 and Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo from 2001-2010); and had its first woman Supreme Court justice (Cecilia Muñoz Palma in 1973) before the United States had one (Sandra Day O’Connor in 1981). These achievements reflect a long history of efforts by women to involve themselves equally in governance as well as in society.

I was expecting a little bit more from the post and was suprised a few of these Filipinas were left out:
Gabriela Silang a revolutionary – a representation of female bravery – who fought against Spanish colonialism in the 18th century. Silang was a contrast to the chaste and religiously devout image of the Filipino lady as portrayed by Jose Rizal through his Spanish-language novels, Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo. 
Clemencia Lopez became the first Filipino to enter the White House and the first to testify before a U.S. Senate hearing as a representative of her subjugated people.
Sofia Reyes de Veyra an educator, social worker and first secretary and co-founder (with Mary E. Coleman) of Asociacion Feminista Filipina, the first women’s club in the Philippines. Its establishment in June 1905 marked the start of the Feminist Movement in the country. She also organized the Manila Women’s Club which later became the nucleus of the National Federation of Women’s Clubs. This federation was in the forefront of the campaign to give women the right to vote and other rights. The women of the Philippines won these rights in 1931.
Dr. Carol Pagaduan-Araullo an UP cum laude graduate, medical doctor, 2012 UP Distinguished Alumni awardee and Bagong Alyansang Makabayan (BAYAN) chairperson. While Dr. Araullo was UP Student Council vice chairman and an activist imprisoned for opposing martial law.
Unabridged version of Hercules, California Councilmember Myrna de Vera’s speech, delivered during the 2012 Filipina Women’s Network’s 100 Most Influential Filipina Women of the US
Philippines was ranked 3rd highest in Asia Pacific region for gender equality according to the Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement report released by global financial firm MasterCard. Yet there’s still PH laws that are unfair to women.
Articles 
Filipinas who were first in PH history
I Am… Woman: Historic Filipinas
#SexTalk: Who is the Filipina of today?
Sampaguita Girl: The Pinay Activist Timeline
Women play key role in PH peace process
VIDEO: Where does the Filipino woman stand today?
Of race and gender clashes: Do women rise above labels?
'Breaking the Silence': The truth about abortion
Defending Filipino women from stereotypes
Importing, exporting stereotypes: How do global Pinays cope?
Barbara Jane Reyes: Virtual Blog Tour, Is Pinay Lit a Genre, and Tagging Others
Books
Denise Cruz’s Transpacific Femininities: The Making of the Modern Filipina
Mina Roces’ Women’s Movements and the Filipina 1986-2008
Melinda L. de Jesús’ Pinay Power: Peminist Critical Theory (reprinted this year)
chidtalk’s recommendations
A systems approach to improving maternal health in the Philippines by Dale Huntington, Eduardo Banzon, and Zenaida Dy Recidoro
Does Feminism Have to Address Race? by Latoya Peterson
Early Feminism in the Philippines by Athena Lydia Casambre and Steven Rood
Feminism and race in the Philippines
Feminism and the present image of Filipino women
Filipiniana: Philippine Women’s Studies
News From the Tropics: Is there Feminism in the Philippines?
Philippines: Feminists Converse on Social Movement Building
The changing role of women in Philippine society by Cicely Richard
The changing role of women in Philippine society by G. Fitzsimmon
The changing role of women in Philippine society by Zakiya Mahomed
Tumblr posts
chidtalk’s post on Filipin@s and Feminism
pinoy-culture’s 10 Kickass Pilipina Warriors in History That You Probably Never Heard Of

deejul did you see this??

This post is liking opening a present. This is fantastic.

    deejul:

    beybladebrigade:

    pag-asaharibon:

    not-your-asian-fantasy:

    Early Feminism in the Philippines

    The Philippines has been noted as having one of the smallest gender disparities in the world. The gender gap has been closed in both health and education; the country has had two female presidents (Corazon Aquino from 1986-1992 and Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo from 2001-2010); and had its first woman Supreme Court justice (Cecilia Muñoz Palma in 1973) before the United States had one (Sandra Day O’Connor in 1981). These achievements reflect a long history of efforts by women to involve themselves equally in governance as well as in society.

    I was expecting a little bit more from the post and was suprised a few of these Filipinas were left out:

    • Gabriela Silang a revolutionary – a representation of female bravery – who fought against Spanish colonialism in the 18th century. Silang was a contrast to the chaste and religiously devout image of the Filipino lady as portrayed by Jose Rizal through his Spanish-language novels, Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo
    • Clemencia Lopez became the first Filipino to enter the White House and the first to testify before a U.S. Senate hearing as a representative of her subjugated people.
    • Sofia Reyes de Veyra an educator, social worker and first secretary and co-founder (with Mary E. Coleman) of Asociacion Feminista Filipinathe first women’s club in the Philippines. Its establishment in June 1905 marked the start of the Feminist Movement in the country. She also organized the Manila Women’s Club which later became the nucleus of the National Federation of Women’s Clubs. This federation was in the forefront of the campaign to give women the right to vote and other rights. The women of the Philippines won these rights in 1931.
    • Dr. Carol Pagaduan-Araullo an UP cum laude graduate, medical doctor, 2012 UP Distinguished Alumni awardee and Bagong Alyansang Makabayan (BAYAN) chairperson. While Dr. Araullo was UP Student Council vice chairman and an activist imprisoned for opposing martial law.

    Unabridged version of Hercules, California Councilmember Myrna de Vera’s speech, delivered during the 2012 Filipina Women’s Network’s 100 Most Influential Filipina Women of the US

    Philippines was ranked 3rd highest in Asia Pacific region for gender equality according to the Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement report released by global financial firm MasterCard. Yet there’s still PH laws that are unfair to women.

    Articles 

    Books

    chidtalk’s recommendations

    Tumblr posts

    deejul did you see this??

    This post is liking opening a present. This is fantastic.

  8. On January 5, 1993, a 22-year-old pre-operative transsexual woman from Seattle, Filisa Vistima, wrote in her journal, “I wish I was anatomically ‘normal’ so I could go swimming… . But no, I’m a mutant, Frankenstein’s monster.” Two months later Filisa Vistima committed suicide. What drove her to such despair was the exclusion she experienced in Seattle’s queer community, some members of which opposed Filisa’s participation because of her transsexuality — even though she identified as and lived as a bisexual woman. The Lesbian Resource Center where she served as a volunteer conducted a survey of its constituency to determine whether it should stop offering services to male-to-female transsexuals. Filisa did the data entry for tabulating the survey results; she didn’t have to imagine how people felt about her kind. The Seattle Bisexual Women’s Network announced that if it admitted transsexuals the SBWN would no longer be a women’s organization. “I’m sure,” one member said in reference to the inclusion of bisexual transsexual women, 4 6 the boys can take care of themselves.” Filisa Vistima was not a boy, and she found it impossible to take care of herself. Even in death she found no support from the community in which she claimed membership. “Why didn’t Filisa commit herself for psychiatric care?” asked a columnist in the Seattle Gay News. “Why didn’t Filisa demand her civil rights?” In this case, not only did the angry villagers hound their monster to the edge of town, they reproached her for being vulnerable to the torches. Did Filisa Vistima commit suicide, or did the queer community of Seattle kill her? (4)

    — 

    TW: Transmisogyny, Transphobia, Suicide

    Source

    (via odofemi)

  9. humansofnewyork:

"What’s your biggest dream for your child?""We’ll let him dream for himself."

(New Delhi, India)

    humansofnewyork:

    "What’s your biggest dream for your child?"
    "We’ll let him dream for himself."

    (New Delhi, India)

  10. staff:

    Today’s the day. The day you help save the internet from being ruined.

    Ready? 

    Yes, you are, and we’re ready to help you.

    (Long story short: The FCC is about to make a critical decision as to whether or not internet service providers have to treat all traffic equally. If they choose wrong, then the internet where anyone can start a website for any reason at all, the internet that’s been so momentous, funny, weird, and surprising—that internet could cease to exist. Here’s your chance to preserve a beautiful thing.)