1. thecommonraven:


sassysinglelady:



  compliments don’t get people killed. 

    thecommonraven:

    sassysinglelady:

    image

      compliments don’t get people killed. 

  2. sinidentidades:

Today Also Marks the Anniversary of Emmett Till’s Murder
On August 28, 1955—eight years before the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom—Emmett Till was murdered in Money, Mississippi for allegedly flirting with a white store clerk, Carolyn Bryant.
Bryant’s husband, Roy, and his half brother J. W.  Milam kidnapped the 14-year-old Chicagoan from his great uncle’s home and beat him, shot him in the head, tied his body to a large metal cotton gin fan with barbed wire and dropped him into the Tallahatchie River. Three days later the teenager’s bloated, mutilated body was pulled from the river.  
Till’s mother, Mamie, insisted on an open-casket funeral for her only son so that the world might see the brutality he suffered. Two Black publications, Jet and The Chicago Defender, ran pictures of Till’s casket. 
Despite overwhelming evidence of their guilt, the two white men who killed Emmett Till were acquitted by an all-white jury. They went on to sell the story of murdering the teenager to Look magazine for $4,000.
The horrific death of Emmett Till is largely credited with intensifying the push for Black voter registration in Mississippi and serving as a catalyst for the civil rights movement in general.

    sinidentidades:

    Today Also Marks the Anniversary of Emmett Till’s Murder

    On August 28, 1955—eight years before the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom—Emmett Till was murdered in Money, Mississippi for allegedly flirting with a white store clerk, Carolyn Bryant.

    Bryant’s husband, Roy, and his half brother J. W.  Milam kidnapped the 14-year-old Chicagoan from his great uncle’s home and beat him, shot him in the head, tied his body to a large metal cotton gin fan with barbed wire and dropped him into the Tallahatchie River. Three days later the teenager’s bloated, mutilated body was pulled from the river.  

    Till’s mother, Mamie, insisted on an open-casket funeral for her only son so that the world might see the brutality he suffered. Two Black publications, Jet and The Chicago Defender, ran pictures of Till’s casket. 

    Despite overwhelming evidence of their guilt, the two white men who killed Emmett Till were acquitted by an all-white jury. They went on to sell the story of murdering the teenager to Look magazine for $4,000.

    The horrific death of Emmett Till is largely credited with intensifying the push for Black voter registration in Mississippi and serving as a catalyst for the civil rights movement in general.

  3. keithboykin:

    Police in Forney, Texas pull over Kametra Barbour, order her out of her car, and place her hands behind her head while her 4 kids (6, 8, 9 and 10) watch. “We got a complaint of a vehicle matching your description and your license plate pointing a gun out the window,” the officer says on video. Police were allegedly following up on a report involving a tan-colored Toyota. The problem, of course, is that Barbour was driving a burgundy Nissan Maxima.

  4. guatepolitics:

"It doesn’t matter who I was, what matters is that I am a trans women and I demand my rights today." — Leslie Graciela, age 7, who was accompanied by community members as a show of support
17 years after the organization Entre Amigos organized the first gay pride march in El Salvador, organizers continue claiming their rights and calling on the state to resolve the problem of hate crimes against the LGBTI community.
(Foto: Fred Ramos | elfaro.net)

    guatepolitics:

    "It doesn’t matter who I was, what matters is that I am a trans women and I demand my rights today." — Leslie Graciela, age 7, who was accompanied by community members as a show of support

    17 years after the organization Entre Amigos organized the first gay pride march in El Salvador, organizers continue claiming their rights and calling on the state to resolve the problem of hate crimes against the LGBTI community.

    (Foto: Fred Ramos | elfaro.net)

  5. gayeskimos:


If you do not know what this picture is; let me inform you. In the late 50’s when abortion was completely illegal, women would resort to using household items to have a self-given abortion. These items included  bleach, wire hangers, and cleaning products.  So, would you rather save unborn cells, like the ones that come off your feet or body, millions at a time, or save a woman who might end up curing a life-threatening disease?  Do we really wanna step 60 years back?

    gayeskimos:

    If you do not know what this picture is; let me inform you. In the late 50’s when abortion was completely illegal, women would resort to using household items to have a self-given abortion. These items included bleach, wire hangers, and cleaning products. So, would you rather save unborn cells, like the ones that come off your feet or body, millions at a time, or save a woman who might end up curing a life-threatening disease? Do we really wanna step 60 years back?

  6. aniki-tony:

Bringing the Pro-pain

    aniki-tony:

    Bringing the Pro-pain

    (Source: kill-1)

  7. felons-jobs:

    generalbriefing:

    Yep this pretty much covers how history is taught here


    Jobs for felons
    jobs for ex-offenders
    jobs

    (Source: sandandglass)

  8. dynamicafrica:

    Photographic works taken by Kélétigui Touré in Mali during the 1940s.

    Recently came across this small collection of studio portraits taken by another great Malian portrait photographer, Kélétigui Touré.

    Touré, who was born in 1922, passed away in 1998. Along with the likes of Seydou Keita, Malick Sidibe and Adama Kouyaté, he was part of the group of photographers who operated studios in Mali in the years prior to and after the country’s independence from France. Although Touré is one of the lesser known photographers, his work is incredibly striking and greatly stands out from his peers.

    All these photographers were taken during the 1940s.

  9. 100dollarsonaladder:

    gifcraft:

    Stop the bullets. Kill the gun.

    This photoset is so appropriate right now…but let’s not limit this gun control and accountability conversation to just citizens…state sanction violence is an issue too